Review of The Lifegiving Home

lifegivinghome Book InformationThe Lifegiving Home: Creating a Place of Belonging & Becoming

Authors – Sally Clarkson and Sarah Clarkson

Publication Information – Tyndale Momentum (February 2016, $15.99 print, $8.57 digital)

Reading Challenge Book? No.

“As I do all of this, I am aware of the Kingdom coming. As I order and hope, fill and form, the Holy Spirit is renewing one more corner of the world. Here, in my room, the fallen stuff of broken earth is being formed back into love, into home.

There’s no place like it.”

– Sarah Clarkson, The Lifegiving Home

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It is no exaggeration to say that I have been longing to read this book since I first learned of its impending release. I stalked it on Netgalley to no avail, and finally pounced on release day.  Apparently, I wasn’t the only one waiting. Our local Lifeway sold out the day the book was released.

So, was it worth it?  Well, the short answer is yes.  This book is exactly the sort of resource for homemaking (home culture, really) that I have wanted for many years. There are many good books on there that touch on how to keep an orderly home, a clean home, a well-planned home where your kids won’t run feral, and so on. However, books on the real heart of a Christian home are few and far between. Continue reading

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A Helpful Read Indeed – Reviewing The Accidental Feminist

accidentalfemBook Information – The Accidental Feminist: Restoring Our Delight in God’s Good Design

Author – Courtney Reissig

Publisher – Crossway Books (June 2015, $11.99 digital, $14.99 print)

*Note: This book releases on May 31, 2015 but it’s available for pre-order NOW at a discounted price!*

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“Many women buy into the idea that equality means sameness – even if they do so in the slightest of ways.” – Courtney Reissig

It’s wisdom like that found in the quote above that kept me glued to this book, reading and rereading it before writing this review. In The Accidental Feminist, Courtney Reissig truly hits one out of the park. Her discussion of biblical womanhood cuts through the stereotypes that have grown up on both the complementarian and egalitarian sides, and she speaks biblical truth into an issue that has grown quite heated in recent years.

Though I have had much exposure to egalitarian circles within the greater church, I was raised in a complementarian home and church, and Reissig does an excellent job of explaining what that truly means in a discussion of biblical womanhood and also of defending her position. I happen to agree with her, but even so, I found her discussion of the topic more compelling then many others I have read. Continue reading